Ubuntu first rolled out their new desktop, one of the things that immediately stood out to me was how closely it resembled MacOS X. It was, in fact, almost too close. But when I played around with it a bit, I immediately noticed where it was lacking polish compared to Apple — and where it had made improvements.

One of the most useful features, too me, was its popup calendar: when you clicked the time in the task bar, a small calendar would pop up, showing the current month, like so:

"> Ubuntu first rolled out their new desktop, one of the things that immediately stood out to me was how closely it resembled MacOS X. It was, in fact, almost too close. But when I played around with it a bit, I immediately noticed where it was lacking polish compared to Apple — and where it had made improvements.

One of the most useful features, too me, was its popup calendar: when you clicked the time in the task bar, a small calendar would pop up, showing the current month, like so:

"> Ubuntu first rolled out their new desktop, one of the things that immediately stood out to me was how closely it resembled MacOS X. It was, in fact, almost too close. But when I played around with it a bit, I immediately noticed where it was lacking polish compared to Apple — and where it had made improvements.

One of the most useful features, too me, was its popup calendar: when you clicked the time in the task bar, a small calendar would pop up, showing the current month, like so:

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Christoph Wagner

Freelance Software Developer

ItsyCal

09 May 2014

A couple of years ago, when Ubuntu first rolled out their new desktop, one of the things that immediately stood out to me was how closely it resembled MacOS X. It was, in fact, almost too close. But when I played around with it a bit, I immediately noticed where it was lacking polish compared to Apple — and where it had made improvements.

One of the most useful features, too me, was its popup calendar: when you clicked the time in the task bar, a small calendar would pop up, showing the current month, like so:

Screenshot

If you do the same on a Mac, however, all you get is a context menu that lets you switch from digital to analog, and a shortcut to the Date & Time preference pane:

Screenshot

How useless! Ever since, I found myself wishing for this feature, hoping that Apple would at some point decide to add this to the OS.

They did not.

So when I found out about Shaun Inman’s Day-O, I was delighted. It was a tiny app whose only purpose was to replace the default clock with one that had a popup calendar. Unfortunately, no integration for appointments, but hey! it was free and it worked, so no complaints there.

I’ve used Day-O for a couple of years, until today, when I somehow stumbled upon ItsyCal. It does essentially the same, but the calendar is a little prettier, supports showing calendar weeks (if you’re into that), AND it shows your upcoming appointments, straight from iCal. So today, I say thanks to Day-O for having me served so well all these years, and hello to ItsyCal. Let’s hope it does its job just as well.

PS: of course, Day-O had something else going for it as well…